Can anyone speak Wolof?

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As a fund raising initiative attaching personal messages to canvas bags, to be given to school children in an impoverished village in The Gambia, seemed like a good idea at the time.

What’s more the messages were written in the native language of Wolof, which seemed like a really nice little touch.

The canvas bags were kindly donated by a local businessman/business boy/entrepreneur (he’s only 17), who had heard about our project and wanted to do something to help.

My daughter came up with a cracking idea to sell the bags for 50p each, at a fund raising evening she organised at her school and to attach parcel tags to the bags on which people could write a message to the recipient. Wilkinson’s in Folkestone kindly donated the tags.

We looked up some Wolof words and phrases on the internet and the idea proved quite popular (as was the fund raising evening at Folkestone School for Girls in Kent which raised £340).

On the tags school pupils, parents and teachers who attended the fund raising evening wrote a range of Wolof phrases – hello (na nga def), my name is (maa ngi tudd), you’re welcome (agsil) and how are you (jam nga am).

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But now comes the hitch. While one canvas bag doesn’t weigh much and takes up hardly any room in a suitcase, 50 or so bags is another story. And as we’ve promised people that their bag will go to a school child in the village, we can’t now go back on that, so some how they have got to be squeezed in, despite problems with volume and weight.

My employer, benenden hospital, also donated canvas bags, but luckily I had the good sense to send those in the shipping container which the charity sent to The Gambia at the end of last year.

This is not my first packing dilemma (there’s also second hand shoes, footballs and 500 miniature teddy bears in my case) and with a few days still to go before we leave, I’m sure it won’t be my last.

Wish me luck!

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