Through Someone Else’s Eyes

gambia 171

It was three weeks ago today that our plane touched down at Gatwick Airport following a week of volunteering in The Gambia, but not a single day has passed without me thinking of the time I spent there.

What sticks in my mind most is one young boy whom I met along the way, called Samba. I first noticed him half way through the trip on a bright, sunny day, when he was sitting in the shade in an area we called The Roundhouse.

Samba’s eyes were flickering open and closed and he was rubbing them with the palms of his hands. He also sat with his hands over his eyes for much of the time, as if the sunlight were painful for him to look at.

Unfortunately I could not communicate very well with Samba, as I did not speak Wolof and he did not appear to know any English.

I asked one of the school teachers if he was blind, but she told me that no, he could see. I asked the two nurses on the trip, Charlotte Barnett, from benenden hospital and Nicola Norton, from Stoke Mandeville Hospital, what was wrong and they told me that they had treated his eyes while running the two day trial at the new BACE health clinic in the village of Bonsa.

They explained that his problems had probably started with conjunctivitis, but as this had been left untreated for so long, it had just got progressively worse. Eventually it could result in him going blind.

Thankfully, the BACE health clinic should be open and fully functional in time to save Samba’s sight and to help others like him. The plan is for the clinic to be up and running by July and an official opening and celebration is planned for November.

I am hoping that from July Samba, with the help of his family, will access the help he needs from the BACE health clinic. I am making a return visit to the village of Bonsa in November, as is nurse Charlotte Barnett and many others who were on the March 2014 volunteer trip and I hope that by then Samba will be running around, laughing and playing with all the other children and that next time I see him he will not be in pain, or uncomfortable, or jostled around by the other children, as he cannot see where he is going.

gambia 169

Having been touched by Samba’s story – and the stories of many others in the village –.I’d like to get some help for him and the other children and adults I saw who also had eye infections or problems with their sight. The best way readers of my blog could help with this at the moment is by donating money directly to BACE. Please text donate by texting BACE13 to 70070 followed by £1, £2, £5 or £10. Alternatively see the BACE website for others ways to give.

Currently I am working with the charity to see if an eye project in the village of Bonsa would be feasible in the near future and I’m working with BACE to this end. They are considering if this could work alongside the many other important activities they already have underway and in the pipeline. There is so much they would like to do – but need more funds to be able to do it, so again, please donate, if you can. I am also seeing if benenden health and benenden hospital can offer any help with this, having funded my March trip to The Gambia, by way of a travelling fellowship, having donated many items to help set up the BACE health clinic and having been extremely supportive of the Someone Else’s Shoes campaign. 

Meanwhile I plan another blog, called Through Someone Else’s Eyes. I want the villagers to tell me their stories, as seen through their eyes. I want to know more about their daily lives, their struggles and how BACE and donations from the UK are making a difference to them.

So although this current trip is now over – and as I very reluctantly write this last blog post for Someone Else’s Shoes – my links with The Gambia and BACE have not come to an end. I am now a voluntary media officer with the charity, alongside my day job, being a PR officer with benenden hospital. I’m very much looking forward to returning to Bonsa in November and I’m trying hard to learn a few words in Wolof. I will be stating “maan wax Wolof”, or I speak Wolof on my next visit!

But for now it is “be benen yoon” (goodbye) to The Gambia – and “leegi leegi” (see you soon).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Can anyone speak Wolof?

canvasbags 001

As a fund raising initiative attaching personal messages to canvas bags, to be given to school children in an impoverished village in The Gambia, seemed like a good idea at the time.

What’s more the messages were written in the native language of Wolof, which seemed like a really nice little touch.

The canvas bags were kindly donated by a local businessman/business boy/entrepreneur (he’s only 17), who had heard about our project and wanted to do something to help.

My daughter came up with a cracking idea to sell the bags for 50p each, at a fund raising evening she organised at her school and to attach parcel tags to the bags on which people could write a message to the recipient. Wilkinson’s in Folkestone kindly donated the tags.

We looked up some Wolof words and phrases on the internet and the idea proved quite popular (as was the fund raising evening at Folkestone School for Girls in Kent which raised £340).

On the tags school pupils, parents and teachers who attended the fund raising evening wrote a range of Wolof phrases – hello (na nga def), my name is (maa ngi tudd), you’re welcome (agsil) and how are you (jam nga am).

canvasbags 011

But now comes the hitch. While one canvas bag doesn’t weigh much and takes up hardly any room in a suitcase, 50 or so bags is another story. And as we’ve promised people that their bag will go to a school child in the village, we can’t now go back on that, so some how they have got to be squeezed in, despite problems with volume and weight.

My employer, benenden hospital, also donated canvas bags, but luckily I had the good sense to send those in the shipping container which the charity sent to The Gambia at the end of last year.

This is not my first packing dilemma (there’s also second hand shoes, footballs and 500 miniature teddy bears in my case) and with a few days still to go before we leave, I’m sure it won’t be my last.

Wish me luck!

canvasbags 004